David Njoku

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This is the third instalment in a series of articles that I’m hoping will serve as a primer for Oracle developers interested in learning about Xquery. And – confession time – I’ve left the best part for last. However, you really should start with Part 1. Good things come to those who wait. In the first article we talked about… Continue Reading →

All Things Oracle Full Articles

In this series of articles I’m hoping to provide a primer for newish Oracle developers who are curious about XQuery and are looking to dip their toes into its world. If that’s you, hi, nice to meetcha. Or rather, nice to meetcha again. This is the second article in the series; go back and read the first if you haven’t… Continue Reading →

All Things Oracle Full Articles

Back at the start of 2007, the bods at W3C announced the birth of a new language. Its name was to be XQuery and it was, they said, to be to XML what SQL is to databases. Whoa, hold a second. That’s a huge claim. That’s kinda like taking your toddler for their first piano lesson and announcing to the… Continue Reading →

All Things Oracle Full Articles, Database Development

I’m that grumpy old guy who comes to your party and sits in a corner with a face like a dog’s backside. You know, that guy who hates everything new: Adele? She’s no Whitney Houston! Bluray? It’s not as good as Betamax! TOAD? It’s not as good as SQL Plus! I’m exaggerating – but only a little. Unless your work… Continue Reading →

All Things Oracle Full Articles, Database Development

We all know this: if a long-bearded prophet came down from a mountaintop bearing the ten commandments of Oracle programming, one of them might read thus: Thou canst select from many tables, but thou may only update, delete from or insert into one table at a time. Right? Well, not exactly. Because you can actually add data to multiple tables… Continue Reading →

All Things Oracle Full Articles

OK, let’s speed past the easy bits, the parts we all already know: standard aggregate functions. Aggregate functions, unlike regular functions, take values from multiple rows as their input. The category includes those aggregate functions that are so ordinary they’re almost invisible – SUM, COUNT, MAX – and a couple that most of us never use – such as APPROX_COUNT_DISTINCT…. Continue Reading →

All Things Oracle Full Articles, Database Development

In the first part of this series I introduced you to the analytic functions family, outlined its close relationship to aggregate functions, and illustrated my points with a few examples. I demonstrated how, by clever use of the analytic function clauses – partition by, order by, and the windowing clause – you could tune your functions to wring even more… Continue Reading →

All Things Oracle Full Articles, Database Development

Analytic functions have been part of Oracle for a very long time now – ever since 8i back in 1999. Analytic functions are an ANSI/ISO standard, and so you’ll find that they are similarly-implemented across a number of compliant databases. (This SQL Server article on “window functions” from sister site, Simple Talk, could very well have been talking about Oracle.) Analytic… Continue Reading →

All Things Oracle Full Articles, Database Development, Oracle Database

We need a baritone voiceover man. You know how those huge TV shows – 24, Prison Break, Jane the Virgin – always start with a recap sequence to bring you up-to-date in case you’d missed the last episode. And it’s always a deep-voiced male narrator: “Previously on The Walking Dead,” he’ll say. We need that guy. Previously on Anatomy of a… Continue Reading →

All Things Oracle Full Articles

My wife and I just welcomed our first child to the world. No, there’s no need to congratulate me; as Chris Rock once said, it’s no big deal, even cockroaches have babies. However, it does mean that I’ve often been up at 3 a.m. rocking my son, mumbling nursery rhymes to him.  Which, of course, always has me thinking of… Continue Reading →

All Things Oracle Full Articles, Database Administration, Database Development