At last week’s Dallas Oracle Users Group meeting, an Oracle DBA asked me, “With all the new database alternatives out there today, like all these open source NoSQL databases, would you recommend for us to learn some of those?”

I told him I had a theory about how these got so popular and that I wanted to share that before I answered his question.

My theory is this. Developers perceive Oracle as being too costly, time-consuming, and complex:

  • An Oracle Database costs a lot. If you don’t already have an Oracle license, it’s going to take time and money to get one. On the other hand, you can just install Mongo DB today.
  • Even if you have an Oracle site-wide license, the Oracle software is probably centrally controlled. To get an installation done, you’re probably going to have to negotiate, justify, write a proposal, fill out forms, …you know, supplicate yourself to—er, I mean negotiate with—your internal IT guys to get an Oracle Database installed. It’s a lot easier to just install MySQL yourself.
  • Oracle is too complicated. Even if you have a site license and someone who’s happy to install it for you, it’s so big and complicated and proprietary… The only way to run an Oracle Database is with SQL (a declarative language that is alien to many developers) executed through a thick, proprietary, possibly even difficult-to-install layer of software like Oracle Enterprise Manager, Oracle SQL Developer, or sqlplus. Isn’t there an open source database out there that you could just manage from your operating system command line?

When a developer is thinking about installing a database today because he need one to write his next feature, he wants something cheap, quick, and lightweight. None of those constraints really sounds like Oracle, does it?

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